Bulisik

Joel Feinber: The Nature and Value of Rights

Posted on: March 12, 2009

Chapter: 9- Joel Feinberg: The Nature and Value of Rights

Book: Contemporary Moral Problems

Author: James E. White

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Contemporary-Moral-Problems-James

White/dp/0495553204/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1234122156&sr=1-1

Quote: “We can make the human beings in it as attractive and virtuous as possible without taxing our conceptions of the limits of human nature.”

What I expect to learn:

The learning expectation for this chapter review would be it would describe the meaning of human rights.

Chapter Review:

For me, this chapter is all about discussing the importance of human rights. Feinberg demonstrate the importance of human rights by imagining Nowheresville, a world like our own except that people do not have rights. As a result, people in this world cannot make moral claims when they are treated unjustly. They cannot demand or claim just treatment, and so they are deprived of self-respect and human dignity. Feinberg also explains the doctrine of the logical correlativity of rights and duties is the doctrine that all duties entail other people’s rights and all rights entails other people’s duties. Fienberg also explain that a personal desert is when a person is said to deserve something good from us what is meant in parts is that there would be certain proprietary in our giving that good thing to him in virtue of kind of person he is, perhaps, or more likely, in virtue of some specific thing he has done.

What I’ve learned:

What have I learned is that it is really important that humans consider every ones human rights.

Integrative Questions:

1. What is Nowheresville?

2. Explain the doctrine of the logical correlativity of right and duties.

3. Explain the concept of personal desert.

4. Explain the notion of a sovereign right-monopoly.

5. What are claim-rights?

Review Questions:

1. Describe Nowheresville. How is this world different from our world?

Nowheresville, a world like our own except that people do not have rights. As a result, people in this world cannot make moral claims when they are treated unjustly. They cannot demand or claim just treatment, and so they are deprived of self-respect and human dignity.

2. Explain the doctrine of the logical correlativity of right and duties. What is Feinberg’s position on this doctrine?

The doctrine of the logical correlativity of rights and duties is the doctrine that all duties entail other people’s rights and all rights entails other people’s duties.

3. How does Feinberg explain the concept of personal desert? How would personal desert work in Nowheresville?

According to Fienberg, Personal desert is when a person is said to deserve something good from us what is meant in parts is that there would be certain proprietary in our giving that good thing to him in virtue of kind of person he is, perhaps, or more likely, in virtue of some specific thing he has done.

4. Explain the notion of a sovereign right-monopoly. How would this work in Nowheresville according to Feinberg?

The notion of Sovereign right-monopoly is about the latter case that he could be said not merely to deserve the good thing but also have a right to it as his due; and of course we will not have that sort of things in Nowheresville. That weaker kind of proprietary which is mere dessert is simply kind of fittingness between ones party’s character or action and another party’s favorable response, much like that between humors, laughter, or good performance applause.

5. What are claim-rights? Why does Feinberg think they are morally important?

Claim rights are conceptual linkage between personal rights and claiming.

Discussion Questions:

1. Does Feinberg make a convincing case for the importance of rights? Why or why not?

Yes, because Feinberg explained the importance of rights through describing Nowheresville.

2. Can you give a noncircular definition of claiming-right?

Claiming Right is something that describes that right is connected with claim.

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